Resources for Domestic/Dating Violence Survivors

Surviving sexual assault, stalking and dating violence can be extremely traumatic. Often, survivors feel very alone and isolated from help, understanding and support. It is important to understand what kinds of things you can do and say to help a friend or family member who is dealing with this type of pain and suffering. Here’s how you can help. It’s not your fault. I’m sorry this happened to you. You don’t deserve to be abused or assaulted. You have rights and options.

Domestic abuse victims in ‘worst-case scenario’ during outbreak, providers say

Domestic violence also named domestic abuse or family violence is violence or other abuse in a domestic setting, such as in marriage or cohabitation. Domestic violence is often used as a synonym for intimate partner violence , which is committed by a spouse or partner in an intimate relationship against the other spouse or partner, and can take place in heterosexual or same-sex relationships, or between former spouses or partners. In its broadest sense, domestic violence also involves violence against children, parents, or the elderly.

Enhance your professional understanding of domestic abuse and learn how to better support domestic violence victims with the University of Sheffield’s online.

When it is a viable option, it is best for victims to do what they can to escape their abusers. However, this is not the case in all situations. Abusers repeatedly go to extremes to prevent the victim from leaving. In fact, leaving an abuser is the most dangerous time for a victim of domestic violence. A victim’s reasons for staying with their abusers are extremely complex and, in most cases, are based on the reality that their abuser will follow through with the threats they have used to keep them trapped: the abuser will hurt or kill them, they will hurt or kill the kids, they will win custody of the children, they will harm or kill pets or others, they will ruin their victim financially — the list goes on.

The victim in violent relationships knows their abuser best and fully knows the extent to which they will go to make sure they have and can maintain control over the victim. The victim literally may not be able to safely escape or protect those they love. In addition to individual obstacles victims face when escaping violent relationships, society in general presents barriers. These include:. Safety Exit! Additional barriers to escaping a violence relationship include by are not limited to: The fear that the abuser’s actions will become more violent and may become lethal if the victim attempts to leave.

These include: A victim’s fear of being charged with desertion, losing custody of children, or joint assets. Anxiety about a decline in living standards for themselves and their children Reinforcement of clergy and secular counselors of “saving” a couple’s relationship at all costs, rather than the goal of stopping the violence.

Lack of support to victims by police officers and law enforcement who may treat violence as a “domestic dispute,” instead of a crime where one person is physically attacking another person.

LIFT Alliance Will Help Survivors of Child, Sexual and Domestic Abuse

Domestic abuse , also called “domestic violence” or “intimate partner violence”, can be defined as a pattern of behavior in any relationship that is used to gain or maintain power and control over an intimate partner. Abuse is physical, sexual, emotional, economic or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person.

This includes any behaviors that frighten, intimidate, terrorize, manipulate, hurt, humiliate, blame, injure, or wound someone. Domestic abuse can happen to anyone of any race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. It can occur within a range of relationships including couples who are married, living together or dating.

Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women – more than car accidents, muggings, and rapes combined. 1/2 of all homeless women and children in.

Families or individuals who have experienced domestic violence are in the process of healing both physically and emotionally from multiple traumas. These traumas can have various effects on the mind, body and spirit. It is natural to experience these, and acknowledging the effects can be an important first step in embarking on a process towards restoration and healing.

People who are exposed to domestic violence often experience physical, mental or spiritual shifts that can endure and worsen if they are not addressed. Even though survivors may experience similar types of abuse, the response to trauma may vary from person to person. Many factors can influence how a person responds to short- and long-term effects of the abuse, such as the frequency of abusive incidents, degree of severity and the effects on physical health.

Other factors can include age in which the trauma occurred, previous exposure to unrelated traumatic incidents and extent of therapy or timing of intervention. Sometimes, it may seem as if the violence defines their identity.

Statistics

NCBI Bookshelf. Martin R. Huecker ; William Smock. Authors Martin R. Huecker 1 ; William Smock 2. Family and domestic violence including child abuse, intimate partner abuse, and elder abuse is a common problem in the United States.

Below we’ve compiled some common questions, with responses from both survivors and friends of survivors. “I think my friend might be in an abusive relationship.

Join [Read More]. The intersection of domestic violence, homelessness, and housing insecurity is undeniable, as lack of safe and affordable housing is often reported as one of the primary barriers survivors of domestic violence face when they choose to leave an abusive partner [1]. Domestic violence is one of the leading causes of homelessness for women and their children.

More than 90 percent of homeless women experience severe physical or sexual abuse at some point in their lives, and 63 percent have been victims of domestic or sexual violence [2]. Although safe housing can provide a pathway to freedom, there are many barriers that prevent survivors from obtaining or maintaining safe and affordable housing. The majority of survivors experience financial abuse, meaning that they have not had access to the family finances, have been prohibited from working, or have had their credit scores destroyed by the abusive partner.

Victims may also face discrimination in accessing or maintaining housing based on the violent or criminal actions of perpetrators. Additionally, victims are limited in the locations and types of housing they can access because of their unique safety and confidentiality needs, and many housing or homelessness assistance programs have barriers that inadvertently exclude victims of violence. Lack of access to safe, affordable housing creates an additional barrier to safety for survivors.

You will see quotes from advocates throughout this article that were collected through the 11 th annual Domestic Violence Counts Census. Our goal is to empower survivors and secure not only permanent housing, but also their independence. Survivors face barriers to housing that can be exacerbated by housing systems that do not address their specific needs.

Domestic Violence

Supporting a friend through an abusive relationship is hard. This can be extremely frustrating as a friend. Know first that abusers are often very charming and skilled at masking their abuse. Recognize that anyone regardless of gender identity, sexual orientation, race, or class can be an abuser, and that abuse can be emotional, psychological, sexual, physical, or financial in nature — or some combination of these.

physical abuse; sexual abuse; financial abuse; coercive control / emotional abuse; digital / online abuse; honour-based violence; forced marriage; female genital.

All of them endured years of physical, emotional and sexual abuse. Several survived being shot. By telling their stories, these survivors are letting others know that it’s possible to overcome both the trauma of domestic violence and the injustice of the system. In my case, it started as verbal abuse. He started changing in After his mum died, he bought several guns including a machete and a shotgun. He became more combative, not only with me but with others and through his social media.

We were having a conversation and at some point it escalated and I asked him to leave. I walked over to the door, opened it and said we could have the conversation another day.

Thermostats, Locks and Lights: Digital Tools of Domestic Abuse

We envision communities fully engaged to provide safety and to give a voice to all affected by domestic abuse, while creating the social change necessary to address its root causes. We honor the wisdom and strength of domestic abuse survivors across the lifespan. Our mission is achievable through survivor-centered work that includes strategic partnerships and collaboration.

As advocates for social justice, we embrace the voices of diverse communities. July 14, by Elise Buchbinder. This statement has been released on behalf of the signatories to several national partners.

IMPORTANT UPDATE AMID THE COVID CRISIS (): Due to COVID​, Domestic Violence Action Center’s Helpline has established.

One woman had turned on her air-conditioner, but said it then switched off without her touching it. Another said the code numbers of the digital lock at her front door changed every day and she could not figure out why. Still another told an abuse help line that she kept hearing the doorbell ring, but no one was there. Their stories are part of a new pattern of behavior in domestic abuse cases tied to the rise of smart home technology.

Internet-connected locks, speakers, thermostats, lights and cameras that have been marketed as the newest conveniences are now also being used as a means for harassment, monitoring, revenge and control. In more than 30 interviews with The New York Times, domestic abuse victims, their lawyers, shelter workers and emergency responders described how the technology was becoming an alarming new tool.

Abusers — using apps on their smartphones, which are connected to the internet-enabled devices — would remotely control everyday objects in the home, sometimes to watch and listen, other times to scare or show power. Even after a partner had left the home, the devices often stayed and continued to be used to intimidate and confuse. For victims and emergency responders, the experiences were often aggravated by a lack of knowledge about how smart technology works, how much power the other person had over the devices, how to legally deal with the behavior and how to make it stop.

The devices are typically positioned as helpful life companions , including when people are at work or on vacation and want to remotely supervise their homes. Some connected device makers said they had not received reports of their products being used in abuse situations. Making it easy for people to switch who controls the account of a smart home product can inadvertently also make access to the systems easier for criminal hackers.

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